Latest News

September 2022

New Improvement Science Snapshot - 10 tips on evaluating changes to audit and feedback to improve care

The latest Improvement Science Snapshot is by Dr Alderson, GP and Clinical Associate Professor in Primary Care. It provides an overview of national audit programmes and gives 10 tips on how to design and test audit and feedback to identify the most effective design. This complements an earlier snapshot on audit and feedback by Professor Robbie Foy at the University of Leeds. If there are any topics relating to quality improvement and improvement science that you think would be helpful for a snapshot please contact Andria Hanbury (andria.hanbury@bthft.nhs.uk).

Watch the snapshot here: https://youtu.be/3gClX3cXL9k

September 2022

Implementation of the Bradford Clean Air Zone

Research by our Healthy Childhood theme's ground-breaking Born in Bradford (BiB) research study has revealed the extent of Bradford residents’ worries about pollution in the city.

The research aims to find out the impact of changes in the city to combat pollution and was set up in response to the implementation of a Clean Air Zone in Bradford which would see older, polluting commercial vehicles pay a daily fee to enter the zone. The Bradford Clean Air Zone has officially come into play today (Monday 26 September 2022).

The team surveyed 1,996 Bradford residents, including 1,154 families who have been participating in the BiB study since their children were born. They found that only 1 in 8 of people surveyed thought that air quality in Bradford was good, and two-thirds thought that it was extremely important to improve air quality in the city.

“Born in Bradford research has provided vital evidence showing the terrible consequences that polluted air has on the health of children living in the city,” explained Professor Rosie McEachan, Co-Theme Lead for the Early Life and Prevention theme at NIHR ARC Yorkshire and Humber.

Dr John Wright, Director of our ARC, said: “The tragedy is that it is Bradford’s children who are harmed most by air pollution. Clean Air Zones are one of the most effective ways for us to protect them. Almost half the schools in Bradford will be in the Clean Air Zone and so our children will be shielded from the toxic effects of traffic-related air pollution.”

Read the full press release here: https://borninbradford.nhs.uk/news-events/news/new-study-reveals-extent-of-pollution-worries-among-bradford-residents/

Colleagues at the School for Health Related Research (ScHARR), at the University of Sheffield are offering a series of online sessions focused on the practical requirements of measuring utility and obtaining utility data for health technology assessment for agencies such as NICE. The course explores up-to-date research and guidance in utilities including mapping, the updated 2022 NICE recommendations for Health Technology Assessment, and identifying utility evidence and using it in cost-effectiveness models.

To find out more about the Utility Data for use in Cost-effectiveness Models sessions and to book, click here.

Our Mental and Physical Multimorbidity theme asked 249 people with severe mental ill health (SMI) questions about their digital skills and digital access, using the Essential Digital Skills framework. Most people who took part in the study had Internet access and a device to connect with. However, when we asked about digital skills, we found that 42% of people with SMI did not have foundation digital skills. These are basic skills such as using passwords and device settings, and lacking these skills leads to digital exclusion. In the general population, 19% of people do not have these basic digital skills. Those who were more able to use the Internet were likely to be younger and have bipolar disorder rather than a psychosis-spectrum disorder. The three biggest barriers to Internet use were people not being interested in using the Internet, finding the Internet too difficult to use and security concerns. Our findings have implications for the provision of mental health services and supports. Read the paper here: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/17579139221106399

Do you want to address the critical gap between evidence and practice? Do you want to do cutting-edge research with interdisciplinary supervisors and develop a career as a research methodologist? If so, this studentship opportunity will appeal to you.

Full description

Global population projections indicate that older people (aged 65 years or older) are the fastest growing sector of the population, with the proportion set to almost double by 2050 (and trebling within the ‘oldest old’ age group aged 85 years or older). Multimorbidity, defined as living with two or more long term conditions, is almost universal in older adults and is associated with increased demand for care. Our ageing population has profound implications for service planning and delivery of evidence-based care.

There is a growing body of research evidence describing and evaluating interventions to improve the health and well-being of older people living in the community. These often involve interdisciplinary teams from health and social care sectors delivering various combinations of support, rehabilitation and health promotion, with the aim of enabling older people to live and function more independently. The most robust evidence for these interventions generally comes from randomised controlled trials, whereby older people are randomly allocated to an intervention or comparison arm and followed up to examine any differences in outcomes. However, there are challenges in designing trials of such interventions and in translating evidence from trials into routine service delivery.

First, these interventions are typically ‘complex’. They involve several interacting parts and may target several groups of people and behaviours to bring about a range of outcomes. It can be difficult to tell why complex interventions appear to work in some trials but not in others. One way forward is to learn more from process evaluations. These are quantitative, qualitative or mixed-methods studies which help explain trial results. The success of complex interventions depends on how the intervention actually works (mechanism of action), whether the intervention is implemented as intended (fidelity), and the circumstances within which the intervention is delivered (context). Process evaluations of trials generally aim to explain whether intervention success or failure is related to one or more of these influences.

Process evaluations from recent, selected systematic reviews of complex interventions targeting older people (e.g. models of rehabilitation, intermediate care, or discharge planning) may offer valuable insights into why such interventions work or not – and therefore inform the future design and implementation of complex interventions.

Second, trial findings may be difficult to translate into routine service delivery. For example, there is a long history of excluding older adults (and particularly the oldest old) from clinical trials of interventions, despite the need for such interventions falling disproportionately in the oldest populations. Thus, there may be difficulties in applying findings from randomised trials if study participants and resources are not typical of those in routine service settings, or previous research fails to adapt interventions developed in younger populations to suit the needs of older people. There are approaches to examine the applicability of trials to ‘real world’ conditions, which can be used to assess their relevance and feasibility to routine service settings.

Third, designing and evaluating new complex interventions is costly and time-consuming. Ideally, interventions of demonstrated effectiveness for a given patient population, service setting and targeted problem should be adapted for use in one or more of a different population, problem or setting. Adaptation may offer a more efficient route to translating evidence into practice than investing in developing new interventions.

This thesis will address these three challenges in a programme of work focused around complex interventions for older people. The programme is likely to include:

A systematic review of process evaluations of randomised trials of complex interventions for older people to explore the degrees to which mechanisms of action, fidelity and context appear to account for intervention effectiveness;

A systematic review of protocols and trial reports of trials of complex interventions for older people to assess applicability to routine service settings;

An interview study with health and social care service leads for older people to consider whether and how a selection of evaluated complex interventions can be adapted to their populations, problems, and service settings.

It is expected that the candidate will develop expertise in mixed-method research skills (qualitative and quantitative methods) with wider transferability to applied health services research.

Environment

The student will be based at the University of Leeds in the Leeds Unit for Complex Intervention Development (LUCID), a methodological research group based across LIHS and the Leeds Institute for Clinical Trials Research, focused on developing and optimising complex healthcare interventions to improve patient and public outcomes. Training will be provided in the relevant technical areas. The student will join doctoral students based in LIHS and also be linked to doctoral students funded by the Yorkshire and Humber ARC. An annual training budget of £750 will also be available to the successful candidate for this studentship.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://phd.leeds.ac.uk/project/1336-translating-complex-interventions-for-older-people-into-routine-service-delivery

Application deadline: Wednesday 28th September 2022

Would you like to take a leading role in a major centre for Ageing research? Do you have an excellent research track record with the vision and drive to tackle new challenges? Are you passionate about delivering world leading research and an exceptional student experience?

This is an exciting opportunity to contribute to the development and leadership of a very successful multi-disciplinary research programme and foster collaborative relationships within the University and with external academic, NHS, local authority, care home, voluntary sector and industry partners. You should have a significant record of successful research and publication, and you will have demonstrated the potential to contribute publications in high impact factor journals and attract grant income in ageing research. You will be able to draw on extensive academic excellence to underpin and carry out research, teaching, leadership and management in the field of ageing research within the ASR and within the wider Institute, School and Faculty.

Click on the link for more information and how to apply: https://jobs.leeds.ac.uk/vacancy.aspx?ref=MHIHS1322

Closing date: Thursday 20th September 2022

This is an exciting opportunity to join an internationally recognised centre for stroke research which is undertaking world leading research. We are seeking an Associate Professor with expertise and particular interest in stroke care to take a leading role in the existing team of applied health researchers and increase grant income from the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) and other funding bodies. It is anticipated that the successful candidate is likely to have expertise in a particular aspect of methodology, for example, qualitative / quantitative approaches, behaviour change or intervention development.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://jobs.leeds.ac.uk/Vacancy.aspx?ref=MHIHS1321

Closing date: Thursday 20th September 2022

Sebastian Hinde, Research Fellow within our Health Economics, Evaluation and Equality theme has released a new video on Understanding and Addressing Inequalities.

Health inequality in economic evaluation and local decision making: same term, different meaning? The video looks at the language and approaches used in considering inequality and health in economic evaluation methodology compared to that used by local commissioners and decision makers. It asks, why worry about health inequality, set within the context of economic evaluation. It looks at the academic approach, along with how decision makers define and measure inequality, and whose responsibility it is at a local level.

Watch the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XL5ItvLmLVw

As part of the ScHARR - Communicable Research Podcast, our Health Economics, Evaluation and Equality theme has released a podcast by Greg Fell, Seb Hinde and Dr Matt Franklin (Episode 11).

They discuss the extent to which decision-makers and economic evaluation frameworks are 'on the same page' when it comes to defining and quantifying health inequalities to help inform the commissioning of care services regionally, with a focus on the current care commissioning landscape across health and adult social care within England.

Listen to the Podcast here: https://anchor.fm/scharr/episodes/ScHARRs-Communicable-Research---Episode-11---Health-inequalities-to-what-extent-are-decision-makers-and-economic-evaluations-on-the-same-page--Greg-Fell-talks-to-Seb-Hinde-and-Dr-Matt-Franklin-e1kj8mr/a-a86cvrg

July 2022

PhD Studentship Opportunity in Lifecourse Epidemiology & Public Mental Health

The Department of Health Sciences, University of York, and the Bradford Institute for Health Research invite applications for a fully-funded full-time PhD studentship to start in January 2023. The project is on childhood mental health and early life experience funded by the Yorkshire and Humber Applied Research Collaboration (YHARC).

This PhD project will explore the role of adversity, social context and economic position on child and adolescent mental health, in The Born in Bradford (BiB) study, the world’s largest multi-ethnic birth cohort. We are particularly interested in how maternal mental health and adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) impact subsequent psychological, cognitive and educational outcomes.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://bit.ly/3zkdkao

Application deadline: Friday 9th September 2022

July 2022

A new article, published by our healthy childhood theme, shares evidence on women’s views of weight management services during pregnancy.

Professor Andrew Clegg (Theme Lead for Older People with Frailty, Yorkshire and Humber ARC) is the Chair of the Ageing Research Trialists (ART) Steering Committee. Established as part of Yorkshire and Humber ARC, this international collaborative brings together trialists with a common focus on transforming care for older people across nations. The team will support individual participant data meta-analysis (IPDMA) in ageing research.

The inaugural paper of the ART collaborative has just been published: https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afac090

April 2022

New Improvement Science Snapshot - The Positive Deviance Approach

In this snapshot, Ruth Baxter talks to us about the Positive Deviance approach and shares some considerations to make when applying it in healthcare.

Watch the snapshot here: https://youtu.be/AbSZTe51AV4

We are pleased to announce that Recovering Quality of Life (ReQoL) Implementation Community of Practice website has undergone some changes. The website now features the ReQoL-10 online visualisation tool and a resources section.

The idea for the online CoP came from delegates who attended the World Café workshop, facilitated during the ReQoL in Practice Event: Building a Community of Practice held in Sheffield on Thursday 29th November 2018. Delegates proposed that the online CoP should host topic threads related to different aspects of implementing ReQoL.

The ReQoL CoP is an online space where people implementing or wishing to implement ReQoL can come together to share learning about implementation issues, processes, barriers and facilitators.

Access the website here: https://reqol-implementation.sites.sheffield.ac.uk/home

We are looking for someone with a background in epidemiology/statistics to take the lead on developing and implementing analysis protocols within the Born in Bradford Healthy Places Team. This will include complex analyses working with big data and repeated measures of air pollution and health data.

Further details here: https://www.jobs.nhs.uk/xi/vacancy/917124374

Application closing date: Friday 29th April 2022

We are looking for someone with qualitative and/or mixed methods skills to take the lead on implementing our flagship NIHR funded BiB Breathes study. The post-holder will oversee all elements of the research programme with support from a multi-disciplinary team, and will take the lead on implementing a comprehensive process and implementation evaluation, as well as citizen science air quality monitoring work in schools.

Further details here: https://www.jobs.nhs.uk/xi/vacancy/917124369

Application closing date: Friday 29th April 2022

March 2022

New report: The Proceedings of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measures (PROMs) Research Conference in Sheffield 2021, which was hosted by our Health Economics, Evaluation and Equality theme have now been published by the Quality of Life Research journal.

You can access the report via this link: https://bit.ly/3qThNfL

The DoI is: https://bit.ly/3Lw3mpv

February 2022

Job Opportunity - Senior Research Fellow /Study Manager: Indoor air quality

Born in Bradford (BiB) is an internationally acclaimed applied research programme which aims to improve health and wellbeing through the development and evaluation of interventions to promote health, and the application of research into practice. We have a vision to promote a healthier, fairer future for children living in deprived areas through a focus on improving environments that can influence health and life chances.

We are looking for an organised, motivated and enthusiastic senior research fellow with strong mixed methods or quantitative research skills to manage our new indoor quality project within our BiB ‘Healthy Places’ research portfolio. Funded by NERC, our Ingenious project (UnderstandING the sourcEs, traNsformations and fates of IndOor air pollUtantS) will monitor indoor air quality in the homes of our Born in Bradford cohort families to investigate how indoor air pollutants can adversely affect the health of people, and explore whether interventions to improve indoor air quality are effective. The post holder will take the lead role in planning, co-ordinating and completing the project, including developing the research protocol and obtaining approvals.

This is a unique opportunity to be part of a new and exciting initiative which will have real impact on improving the life chances of some of the poorest children growing up in the UK by making lasting changes to the environments in which they live.

This is a full time post however, Part time working considered, minimum 26 hours a week (3.5 days).

From 1 April 2022 all healthcare workers in settings providing regulated activity must be fully vaccinated against Covid-19 as a condition of employment unless they are exempt under the regulations. This will apply to everyone working in clinical roles and/or working in clinical areas

We can offer staff gymnasiums on both hospital sites, excellent pension scheme and advice on childcare.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://www.jobs.nhs.uk/xi/vacancy/917012952

Application deadline: 17th March 2022

February 2022

New Improvement Science Snapshot - Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) in general

In this snapshot, Professor Finch describes how Normalisation Process Theory can help us understand challenges in health and social care improvement work.

Watch the snapshot here: https://youtu.be/hoH5HRXCg8I

January 2022

Our Implementation arm, the Improvement Academy, have published the a new report that details NHS staff experiences of working under prolonged intense pressure, alongside four offers of support designed to respond to immediate need and learn new ways to help. Download here: https://bit.ly/3Q4cGDI

NHS riding the waves cartoon. Caption reads: Are they 'riding the waves' OK or is that ship actually going under?

December 2021

PhD Opportunity - Systems level modelling in older people/urgent and emergency care

The School of Health related Research, at the University of Sheffield is pleased to advertise a funded PhD opportunity. The studentship is part of a research programme for the NIHR Applied Research Collaborations (NIHR ARCs). The Health Economics, Evaluation and Equality (HEEE) cross-cutting theme aims to work collaboratively with the four core themes and in partnership with local NHS, public health and social care collaborators. This research will focus on improving efficiency and equity in the use of public resources using methods for conducting cross-sector evaluations including mathematical modelling, statistical and econometric methods. The HEEE theme are offering a PhD opportunity and strongly encourage candidates to propose topics in the following areas:

  • Older Peoples Theme

Develop a system level approach to model the economic arguments of implementing interventions to prevent/improve frailty and delayed transfers of care (DTOC) for older people with complex and heterogeneous needs. The theme will look to simulate the reality of supply side availability and constraints as well as using conventional economic theory to understand the economic incentives and outcomes for patients and stakeholders such as the NHS and Social Services.

  • Urgent and Emergency Care Theme

Develop a systems modelling approach to identify and evaluate options for preventing excessive Emergency Departments waiting times. We are particularly interested in developing simulation approaches to examine system level interventions to reduce ED attendances and manage flows through a Department. For example, work may focus on the analysis of options to avoid unnecessary attendances or to avoid delays in transferring patients out of hospital, the design of performance metrics that avoid perverse incentives, or combinations of interventions. The successful applicant will have access to a large routine data set of the ED including arrivals, investigations and treatments in hospitals within the region to help inform the model.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://www.findaphd.com/phds/project/systems-level-modelling-in-older-people-urgent-and-emergency-care-with-the-health-economics-evaluation-and-equality-theme-heee-of-the-arc-yh/?p134121

Application deadline: Friday 28th January 2022

November 2021

New Improvement Science Snapshot - Co-production of applied health and research

In this snapshot, Dr Helen Smith walks us through what co-production is, providing some advice on how to use it in applied health research.

Watch the snapshot here: https://youtu.be/24o5w_egPoE

Our Mental and Physical Multimorbidity theme are looking for an enthusiastic Research Associate with experience of quantitative research and cohort studies to join the Mental Health and Addiction Research Group led by Professor Simon Gilbody at the Department of Health Sciences, University of York.

This programme, is being led by the HEY Smile Foundation and the Humber, Coast and Vale Health and Care Partnership and aims to develop a ‘test and learn’ site for Green Social Prescribing across the six places of East Yorkshire, Hull, North Yorkshire, Vale of York, North Lincolnshire and North East Lincolnshire.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://bit.ly/3nMf6eD

Application closing date: Friday 3rd December 2021.

Our Older People with Frailty theme are looking for an enthusiastic, highly organised and motivated individual to join our exciting new research programme in the role of a Research Fellow.

The programme aims to explore current evidence and service provision, and then working closely with PPI colleagues and other stakeholders to develop service model(s) to support older people living with frailty to manage their pain and reduce its impact on their lives.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://www.jobs.nhs.uk/xi/vacancy/916828691

Application closing date: Sunday 14th November 2021.

A fantastic opportunity has arisen in our Older People with Frailty theme within the Academic Unit for Ageing and Stroke Research (ASR) for a Senior Research Fellow to implement high quality health research addressing the needs of an ageing population.

We are looking for an enthusiastic, organised and motivated researcher with qualitative experience to take on the role of Senior Research Fellow.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://www.jobs.nhs.uk/xi/vacancy/916833191

Application closing date: Monday 15th November 2021.

We have an exciting opportunity for an Implementation and Evaluation Research Fellow to join our Implementation team in the Improvement Academy. We are looking for a passionate and hard-working researcher with an interest in learning more about implementation science and how to apply it.

The post-holder will work with our Implementation Specialist on a number of research and implementation evaluation projects.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://www.jobs.nhs.uk/xi/vacancy/916795218

Application closing date: Monday 1st November 2021.

Image of Improvement Academy Team

September 2021

New Improvement Science Snapshot - Implementation Outcome Instrument Repository

In this snapshot, Dr Louise Hull, Kings College London, introduces a much needed, newly developed, implementation outcomes repository to help people to select suitable outcome measures when evaluating implementation efforts.

Watch the snapshot here: https://youtu.be/GXXpmRt5YeY

Image of Improvement Academy Team

We have an exciting opportunity for an Implementation Research Fellow to join our Implementation team in the Improvement Academy. The Implementation Fellow will support clinical staff (including nurses, doctors, healthcare assistants and other healthcare professionals), researchers and managers, in focussed implementation projects.

The post-holder will work closely with our Implementation Specialist on a number of implementation research projects.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://www.jobs.nhs.uk/xi/vacancy/916752014

Application closing date: Monday 11th October 2021.

September 2021

Applications open for NIHR ARC North Thames Academy's Economic Evaluation Online course

In response to the needs of health and care professionals working across our region and beyond, NIHR ARC North Thames, with support from our Health Economics Evaluation and Equality theme, are offering a new online course, providing a unique opportunity to develop economic evaluation skills with leading trainers, irrespective of previous experience.

This fully flexible and self-paced course is intended as an introduction for frontline staff in health, social care and local government organisations, who have limited experience of conducting economic evaluations and generating evidence to inform decision-making.

There are very few introductory courses for carrying out economic evaluations of services and innovations, and so we have developed this course to meet the growing training needs of the health and social care community.

Yorkshire and Humber ARC has 10 places reserved for its partners. For more information and to apply, click here.

July 2021

PhD Opportunity - Core outcome measures for the evaluation of complex interventions targeted at sustaining independence in older people with frailty

The overarching aim of Yorkshire and Humber ARC's Older people with frailty theme is to improve physical and mental health of older people living with frailty, including care home residents, and generate major health and care efficiency savings.

This PhD provides the successful candidate with scope to explore varying directions within the objectives set out to achieve the stated aim based on their interests and skills. They will have the opportunity to work closely with other Yorkshire and Humber ARC researchers to ensure this PhD complements ongoing research in this area.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://phd.leeds.ac.uk/project/947-core-outcome-measures-for-the-evaluation-of-complex-interventions-targeted-at-sustaining-independence-in-older-people-with-frailty

Application closing date: Friday 13th August 2021.

July 2021

New Improvement Science Snapshot - Video Reflexive Ethnography for Healthcare Improvement

Video reflexive ethnography is a quality improvement method gaining traction in the health services. In this Improvement Science snapshot, Dr Siobhan McHugh tells us what it is, drawing on her own experience of using the approach with maternity care teams.

Watch the snapshot here: https://youtu.be/OjgihFfFv-E

July 2021

PhD Opportunity - Improving support for people with severe mental illness to quit smoking: comparing a bottom up with a top-down quality improvement approach

This is an exciting opportunity to undertake a PhD within Yorkshire and Humber ARC's Improvement Science theme.

People with severe mental illness (SMI) die on average 15-20 years younger than people without SMI (Brown et al., 2010). The main cause is preventable physical diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes (Thornicroft, 2011). Health risk behaviours contribute to the increased risk of such diseases in people with SMI, with smoking being one of the most important modifiable risk factors (Firth et al., 2019).

This PhD studentship will address this research gap, applying the positive deviance approach, which is a bottom up approach to quality improvement, to identify recommendations for how better to support people with SMI to reduce or stop smoking. The PhD will also compare these recommendations with those developed using a more traditional 'top down' approach of an evidence review. As such the PhD will compare a bottom up with a top down approach to developing improvement recommendations.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://phd.leeds.ac.uk/project/1074-improving-support-for-people-with-severe-mental-illness-to-quit-smoking-comparing-a-bottom-up-with-a-top-down-quality-improvement-approach

Application closing date: Monday 30th August 2021.

July 2021

Improving the health of people with mental and physical health problems - what are the most important questions for research?

Our Mental Health theme have created a follow-up questionnaire which includes topics that are most important to those living with both mental and physical health problems, their families, and the health and social care professionals who treat and support them.

Read more about this here: Priority Setting Follow-up Questionnaire for Mental Health

Yorkshire and Humber ARC's Older People with Frailty theme are co-leading an NIHR approved research programme with NIHR ARCs in Wessex, Greater Manchester and South West Peninsula.

The research programme is focused on the health challenges facing our growing older population and will support three multi-regional projects.

Read more about this here: National Priority Area of Healthy Ageing, Dementia, and Frailty

June 2021

Bradford and Craven Innovation Hub - Improvement Academy supporting leaders to implement innovations that will improve outcomes locally

Bradford District and Craven has been selected by the Health Foundation to be one of four Innovation Hubs. The project will involve all NHS organisations across the Bradford District and Craven ‘place’ including, the local authority working alongside the Voluntary and Community Sector Assembly; Healthwatch Bradford; Bradford Institute of Health Research; Yorkshire & Humber Academic Health Science Network; Yorkshire and Humber Improvement Academy; and the University of Bradford. There will be a dedicated post to bring innovation to life and tackle the health inequalities that affect our communities.

YHARC’s Implementation arm, the Yorkshire and Humber Improvement Academy will act as coaches and mentors to those leading implementation of innovations so that the Innovation Hub has a strong evidence-based approach and to embed changes that help improve outcomes for people across that place.

Read the full press release here.

June 2021

Unlocking real-world data to promote and protect health and prevent ill-health in the Yorkshire and Humber region

The Universities of Sheffield, York, and Leeds have joined forces with Local Authorities and Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) from the Sheffield and York areas, and the Yorkshire and Humber Care Record (YHCR) to ‘unlock’ the potential of routinely collected real-world data to promote and protect health and prevent ill-health in local and regional settings.

The project’s Principal Investigator (PI), Dr Matthew Franklin (University of Sheffield), sheds some light on why unlocking routine ‘real-world data’ is important, and what needs to be taken into account in order to protect and benefit members of the public - who the data represents.

Read the blog Unlocking real-world data at http://scharrheds.blogspot.com/2021/06/unlocking-real-world-data-to-promote.html

A downloadable version of the Blog is also available here: https://doi.org/10.15131/shef.data.14723685.v1

June 2021

New Improvement Science Snapshot - A quick guide to effective audit and feedback

In this Improvement Science snapshot, Professor Robbie Foy runs us through the evidence on how to make audit and feedback more effective. Robbie has also produced a helpful audit and feedback glossary term and references document.

Watch the snapshot here: https://youtu.be/0n__SXHvjjk

June 2021

New Publication - Patient compliance with NHS 111 advice: Analysis of adult call and ED attendance data 2013-2017

The NHS 111 telephone advice and triage service is a vital part of the management of urgent and emergency care (UEC) services in England. Demand for NHS 111 advice has increased since its introduction in 2013, and the service is of particular importance in light of the current pandemic and resulting increased demand for emergency care. Currently, little is known about the effectiveness of NHS 111 in terms of the appropriateness of the advice given, or about the compliance of patients with that advice. Our Urgent and Emergency Care theme aimed to address this issue by analysing a large linked routine dataset of all NHS 111 calls (n = 3,631,069) and subsequent emergency department (ED) attendances made in the Yorkshire & Humber region from March 2013-March 2017.

Read the full publication here: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33970946/

June 2021

PhD Opportunity - What is primary care epileptology?

This is an exciting opportunity to undertake a PhD within Yorkshire and Humber ARC's Urgent and Emergency Care theme.

Epilepsy care is suboptimal and the role of primary care poorly defined. Mobilisation of primary care could lead to improved outcomes. The PhD candidate will work with leaders in the field to develop expertise in research methods, synthesise the published evidence, create a conceptual framework, based on the theory of expert medical generalism, and make policy and training recommendations.

For further information and to apply, click here.

Application closing date: Sunday 11th July 2021.

May 2021

New Improvement Science Snapshot - Behaviour change techniques: what are they and how do I use them?

In this Improvement Science snapshot, Professor Rebecca Lawton from our Improvement Science theme walks us through behaviour change techniques: what they are and how to make use of them.

Watch the snapshot here: https://youtu.be/KAbOn2hijBA

The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted an increase in ‘quit smoking’ initiatives in the wider population. A study from our Mental Health theme has been published which reports on heavier smoking and high levels of nicotine dependence among people with severe mental ill health (SMI) during the pandemic.

Read more about the key findings from this study here: https://www.arc-yh.nihr.ac.uk/news-events-and-media/news/heavier-smoking-in-people-with-smi-during-covid-19

We have an exciting opportunity for a Research Assistant to join our Urgent and Emergency Care (UEC) theme. The post holder will have quantitative and qualitative skills to work in the dynamic field of urgent and emergency care (UEC) health services research and join the School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR).

The post holder will join a team of health service researchers, data managers and statisticians in the our Urgent and Emergency care theme and assist in research activities to improve the organisation and delivery of UEC both regionally and nationally.

For further information and to apply, click here: https://tinyurl.com/vb6ptjcw

Application closing date: Thursday 27th May 2021.

April 2021

Collaborating to improve child and maternal health PenARC and ARC Yorkshire and Humber

The Child Health and Maternity priority programme, led by PenARC and ARC Yorkshire and Humber, have worked collaboratively on a prioritisation process, bringing together stakeholders from across England to identify the most pressing national child and maternal health interventions.

The ARCs are excited to now be able to share which four they are in this news story: https://www.arc-yh.nihr.ac.uk/news-events-and-media/news/collaborating-to-improve-child-and-maternal-health

April 2021

New Improvement Science Snapshot - Realist methods for design and evaluation

Here is the second Improvement Science Snapshot developed by our Improvement Science team. It is on realist methods in design and evaluation and is presented by Professor Rebecca Randell from our Improvement Science theme.

Watch the snapshot here: https://youtu.be/A93aHmR2GmE

March 2021

PhD Opportunity- De-implementation of low value practices (clinical and non-clinical): A patient perspective

This is an exciting opportunity to undertake a PhD within the Yorkshire and Humber Applied Research Collaboration funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

This is one of two scholarships currently available within our Improvement Science Theme. The scholarships will be hosted within the School of Psychology within the University of Leeds. You will also be part of a stimulating and supportive network of students working across the NIHR Yorkshire and Humber ARC and the Yorkshire and Humber Patient Safety Translational Research Centre.

For further information and to apply, click here.

Application closing date: Tuesday 27th April 2021.

March 2021

PhD Opportunity- Improving professional practice through individualised feedback: accelerating “learning-on-the-job” in complex clinical settings

This is an exciting opportunity to undertake a PhD within the Yorkshire and Humber Applied Research Collaboration funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR).

This is one of two scholarships currently available within our Improvement Science Theme. The scholarships will be hosted within the School of Psychology within the University of Leeds. You will also be part of a stimulating and supportive network of students working across the NIHR Yorkshire and Humber ARC and the Yorkshire and Humber Patient Safety Translational Research Centre.

For further information and to apply, click here.

Application closing date: Tuesday 27th April 2021.

March 2021

Launch of Improvement Science Snapshots - How to identify barriers to improving clinical practice

Designed and delivered by our Improvement Science theme, these short videos introduce practitioners, researchers and anyone else with an interest in improvement science to key methods and approaches in an accessible way.

The first snapshot in the series covers how to identify barriers to improving clinical practice, and is provided by Dr Andria Hanbury from the Improvement Science theme of the Yorkshire and Humber ARC.

Watch the snapshot here: https://youtu.be/9QmiKYL5hY8

March 2021

Yorkshire and Humber ARC & PSTRC Newsletter - In collaboration with the Yorkshire and Humber Patient Safety Transitional Research Centre

This month's newsletter shares some of the fantastic research to form the COVID-19 response in Yorkshire. We're excited to have collaborated with our colleagues in the Y&H PSTRC to create this bulletin which includes the following articles:

  • Lessons from the frontline: The impact of redeployment during COVID-19 on nurse well-being, performance and retention

  • Research from Bradford suggests that those who need the Covid-19 vaccination the most may be less likely to accept it needed to help target a local COVID-19 response

  • Co-creating healthcare system resilience: Exploring peoples’ responses to the COVID-19 pandemic

  • Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on care home pathways, outcomes and safety of care

  • Caring in a crisis: Understanding the stressors and uplifts for NHS frontline staff and those supporting them during the COVID-19 crisis

  • Supporting research with patient and public involvement/engagement through COVID

YH PSTRC 2021 PSTRC_ARC Newsletter.pdf

Hosted by the Society for Academic Primary Care (SAPC) and the Yorkshire and Humber ARC's Mental and Physical Multimorbidity theme, this year's conference theme is 'Mental Health: person and place' and will showcase primary care mental health research currently being undertaken in the UK.

Conference themes include: ‘online spaces and green places’; ‘inequalities’; ‘connections and connecting’; ‘wellbeing and self-care’ and ‘adapting and transitioning’.

We are now inviting abstract submissions (250 words) for elevator pitches. These presentations will consist of a single slide; the speaker will have three minutes to present their slide, followed by 2 minutes for questions. We particularly welcome submissions from early career researchers.

You can submit your abstract by emailing it to ruth.wadman@york.ac.uk (deadline 5pm 26th February 2021).

February 2021

COMING SOON: Improvement Science Snapshots

Our Improvement Science theme are currently developing ‘Improvement Science Snapshots’ which are short pre-recorded sessions covering improvement science methods and approaches.

The videos, hosted on the Yorkshire Quality and Safety Research (YQSR) Group’s YouTube channel, are targeted at health professionals and researchers with an interest in learning more about improvement science and will cover a range of topics delivered by different presenters.

Click here to subscribe to the channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/YQSR

November 2020

Yorkshire and Humber ARC Newsletter - Read our latest newsletter here

This month's newsletter includes articles on the following topics:

  • Use of Urgent and Emergency Care in individuals with serious mental illness

  • Patient and public involvement during the time of COVID-19

  • Promoting shorter hospital stays for older people

  • Patient and Public Involvement/Engagement (PPIE)

  • Investigation into the care pathways for people with chronic respiratory conditions

  • Working with the third sector to implement Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMS)

  • Coming soon: Essential Implementation podcasts

Nov 2020 YHARC Newsletter.pdf

November 2020

Emerald Literati Award awarded to our Health Economics, Evaluation and Equality (HEEE) theme

Noted by the Emerald Insight editorial team as: “one of the most exceptional pieces of work they saw throughout 2019’, our HEEE theme's paper has been awarded for research on an extensive analysis of the Harrogate Vanguard programme.

The paper Does the integration of response services lead to meaningful change in healthcare activity? A case study evaluation looks at the NHS England Vanguards of new care models was to improve healthcare provision and integration through the coordination of services, seeking to deliver the Five Year Forward View.

The purpose of our paper is to report on an extensive analysis of one of the Vanguard programmes, exploring whether the implemented integrated response service (IRS) based in Harrogate, England, resulted in any meaningful change in secondary healthcare activity.

October 2020

Patient Reported Outcome Measure resource and checklist launched to support those using PROM data for evaluation

Led by Dr Clara Mukuria, from the University of Sheffield, along with her colleagues on the Health Economics, Evaluation and Equality theme, Professor Tracey Young and Dr Alexis Foster. They have developed a Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) resource and checklist.

The resource aims to support the process of selecting and implementing PROMs in different contexts where PROM data is used for evaluation. The checklist, found within the resource and as an accompanying document, should be used from the early stages of any evaluation work to ensure appropriate PROMs are selected and that implementation is planned.

You can access the PROMs Resource and checklist here.

We would really like to know how you use the resource and if you have any questions relating to its use, please contact us at ARC_HEEE@Sheffield.ac.uk.

October 2020

The experiences of lockdown for families in Bradford during the COVID-19 pandemic - new findings from the Born in Bradford study

Crucial findings from the first in a series of Born in Bradford (BiB)1 COVID-19 research studies have been published in a paper on the Wellcome Open Gateway2. Since 2007, Born in Bradford has been following the lives of over 36,000 Bradford residents, including ethnically diverse and socio-economically deprived populations. The findings are part of a broader series of adaptive research activities3 (Figure 1) supporting the Bradford District COVID-19 Scientific Advisory Group4 response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Born in Bradford and other research infrastructure at Bradford Institute for Health Research5 have been harnessed to answer some of the key questions that local policy and decision makers are asking as they determine and co-ordinate the local response to COVID-19. Engagement and consultation with the community, including those seldom-heard, and decision makers is central in shaping and are shaping the study design and content through this adaptive process.

These first findings in the series, covering the period April - June 2020, report the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated restrictions on mothers and families during this time. They showed that a large number of families were experiencing housing, food and employment insecurities, with one in three reporting being worse off financially than the three months prior to lockdown. Insecurities were also associated with being furloughed, self-employed and not working or being unemployed. There was evidence of increasing inequalities and of families being pushed into poverty.

Clinically significant depression and anxiety symptoms were reported by 18% and 16% of mothers respectively. Nearly one in four households included a member who was considered clinically vulnerable to COVID-19 (advised to shield, over 70 years of age, pregnant etc). The most common worry of respondents sharing their lived experience of the pandemic was that their children or wider family members might catch COVID-19 and become seriously ill or die. Financial insecurity, mental health and home schooling were other reoccurring concerns in responses.

Further survey rounds are planned with parents, children, pregnant and postpartum women over the course of the next 12 months as part of a longitudinal study to understand the changing impact of the pandemic. Recent data collection and linked data for the cohort provides a pre-pandemic data baseline, supporting better understanding of the pandemics’ impact. These surveys are being complemented by in-depth qualitative research with community leaders, parents, children, pregnant and postpartum women and their partners over the same period. Collectively, this body of research offers a unique view into the lives of families and children during the COVID-19 pandemic and will go some way to address the local research and intelligence needs of communities and decision makers responding to it.

https://www.bradfordresearch.nhs.uk/c-sag/

https://wellcomeopenresearch.org/articles/5-228/v1

https://wellcomeopenresearch.org/articles/5-191/v1

https://www.bradfordresearch.nhs.uk/c-sag/

https://www.bradfordresearch.nhs.uk/

Figure 1

September 2020

Survey: Improving the health of people with mental and physical health problems - what are the questions you would like to see answered by research?

We want to give people living with both mental and physical health problems, their families, and the health and social care professionals who treat and support them, a voice in deciding the most important questions to be answered by future research.

Dr Liz Newbronner, who is leading this work comments “we are really interested to hear what people think we should be looking at in our research projects, and this will be crucial in developing our research over the coming years”.

To do this, we have created a short survey where people can tell us what is important to them, about improving the health of people with mental and physical health problems. The survey will be open until the end of October 2020.

If you would like to take part in this survey, click here. (paper copies available on request)

Our aim is to identify unanswered questions about what would help people with mental health problems look after their physical health. For example, what treatments and services, if examined by research could make a real difference to peoples’ lives. Working with communities and partner organisation from across Yorkshire and Humber we will then prioritise those that are the most important for research to address and plan how we might respond to them.

Our work is being guided by our fantastic priority setting Steering Group, which includes people with experience of mental health problems and clinicians.

September 2020

PhD Opportunity - Addressing the needs of older people with frailty

The Academic Unit for Ageing and Stroke Research is pleased to announce an excellent PhD scholarship opportunity - Addressing the needs of older people with frailty.

The scholarship is part of the Older People with Frailty theme in the NIHR Yorkshire and Humber Applied Research Collaboration.

For further information and to apply, click here.

Application closing date: Wednesday 7th October 2020.

September 2020

PhD Opportunity - The management of acute paediatric episodes of care within the urgent and emergency care system.

Based at the University of Sheffield, this PhD opportunity is part of the ARC YH Urgent and Emergency Care (UEC) Theme, led by Professor Suzanne Mason. Aims include: to deliver improvements to demand and flow through the UEC system using a learning health systems approach, prioritising outcomes important to patients and providers and building on a track record of delivery and impact in this area of national NHS priority.

For further information and to apply, click here.

Application closing date: Saturday 31st October 2020.

January 2020

Inspiring videos show smokers with mental health conditions who successfully quit

As part of an output from the CLAHRC SCIMITAR+ study, former smokers with mental health conditions have shared their inspiring journeys on how they conquered their addiction in a series of powerful short films. Watch the videos and read the full article here.